Blogging Advice

I Tried First 5 ‘Work From Home’ Ads I Saw On Facebook

My Facebook feed is full of bloggers, entrepreneurs, and pretty much everyone offering their courses. The wording is usually the same. They want to show how to start a side hustle, how to work from home, how to make XY 6+ figures amount of money per month doing work online, how to travel full-time, yadda yadda yadda. You know the drill. Each day, there are about 10 new bloggers, social media and marketing experts, doing exactly the same thing on my newsfeed. So I thought I’d give them a try and see if it’s really worth purchasing their products and what you actually get in those FREE checklists and courses they advertise.

I’ll probably get in trouble for this but let’s do it!

Disclaimer: I’m not an affiliate or BFFs with any of these people – I’m just fascinated by the fact this is now common practice and wonder about the legitimacy of these courses that claim they can offer you so much. I didn’t edit this much, sorry if I sound too harsh 😉 

I Tried First 5 Ads I Saw On Facebook

  1. FREE Workshop: How To Start A Wildly Successful Side Hustle by Susie Moore

    I Tried First 5 Ads I Saw On Facebook

Alright, so this one claims it’s fluff-free and jam-packed with valuable and actionable content. Her work’s apparently been featured on Forbes (article not working when clicked on Google), Business Insider (always features the same writers, so I’m guessing there’s some sort of PR partnership going on), etc. etc. Her Huffington Post author bio claims that her corporate career paid her $500,000 in her final year at age of 30, which is pretty much the skillset foundation for her online business, so I really want to see what she has to say about starting a business even if you lack confidence etc. etc.

Things I liked: She mentions having a passion for what you do more than she mentions money. The first video gives an important lesson on how to find your passion without going into monetization first. Also, huge thumbs up for having video transcripts.

What I didn’t like: Apparently you don’t receive the workshop all in one day – wasn’t mentioned before. I understand it’s a side hustle thing and it helps people not feel overwhelmed, but at the same time, it’s misleading – I’d rather see a Facebook AD that says 10-day Side Hustle Workshop for transparency. I’d love to have a checklist alongside the video that would help me work my way through the steps Susie mentions would help me find my passion.

On that note, the fluff-free adjective she mentions in the Facebook AD gets lost to me with this sentence in the email: “In Video 2, you’re going to learn the ONLY five things you need to start making money from your Side Hustle.” – and I bet they’re ‘determination’, ‘persistence’, ‘long-term plan,’ etc. etc. aka fluff aka not a real answer.

Will I continue with the workshop: Nah, sorry 🙁

  1. Social Media Rules Have Changed by John and Nadya

    I Tried First 5 Ads I Saw On Facebook

John and Nadya are home business experts and 7-figure earners according to their Facebook bio. Their AD claims that they will share social media tips that helped scale their business to six-figures a year to six-figures a month. Their taxes must be insane. After Googling them, they appear on a few podcasts, but as far as producing their own content goes, they aren’t really showing up. I do love their FB page, which is fairly active (although 40k followers wouldn’t be enough to make 6 figures per month).

Things I didn’t like: The first email is basically an opt-in to join their group and doesn’t really reveal anything – you don’t receive anything until you’re approved. Second email contains the phrase “It’s official .. you’re a genius!” which immediately put me off as I felt like things were going to get dumbed down for me. Waiting too long to be accepted into the group, the novelty of your FB AD already started to wear off. 

Things I liked: Friendly language. They have blog posts but those weren’t even mentioned in the email! I’d love a section like ‘while you wait, have a read of some of our popular blog posts’.

Will I continue with this? No, it gives away absolutely nothing with the first 3 opt-ins and it honestly looks like it’s a waste of time. In their own words, I’m ‘fired up’ and ready to go, but nothing is happening. On that note, I have a feeling this is pretty much affiliate marketing and sponsorship done through the group. I didn’t even notice they had blog posts until I went on their Instagram – I’ll definitely browse through those.

Update: Their emails they send after you sign up are completely irrelevant to what you’ve signed up for. They also don’t really offer value and are just promotional emails for the group.

  1. This Free Book Paid For My Tesla by Dean Graziosi

    I Tried First 5 Ads I Saw On Facebook

I’m a huge fan of video Facebook ADs and this guy is really grabbing the attention. I’ve heard of Dean Graziosi before, so I kind of know what to expect. It might be a good warning that if you Google Dean Graziosi, the second link you see is people asking how big of a scam he is.

Here’s the best part: after you put in your name and email, it asks you to pay for $20 shipping fees. He argues that ‘the book is free, I’m just asking for shipping costs’. Sure, smart marketing, but it doesn’t help the fact that you’re connected to the word ‘scam’ on the first page of Google. While I personally don’t think that’s the case, it definitely doesn’t portray him in a good light. 

I have watched Millionaire Success Habits on YouTube, which is probably more insightful than this so-called ‘free book’.  It’s extremely powerful and shares a lot about his habits that I’ll actually start implementing. The dude knows his stuff but his AD is a complete miss – I’ll stick to free content that’s available from podcasts, thank you.

  1. How to Retire in 100 Days as a ClickFunnels Super Affiliate by Russell Brunson

I Tried First 5 Ads I Saw On Facebook

I’ve also heard of Russell Brunson before and his ad has been in my face for a while before I decided to write this. If you Google him, you get some Forbes articles, his own website, an Amazon book, yadda yadda, the usual stuff. I don’t particularly want to retire and I’m definitely not interested in ClickFunnels (why is this on my feed), but let’s give this a try.

Things I liked: Immediate access. Yes please. No separate days with emails, immediate access. All 100 days in front of you in a form of educational YouTube clips. There are resources, everything you need from basically Day 1. Emails are almost unnecessary.

Things I didn’t like: His drawing is terrible. You’ll probably not retire after 100 days of doing this, let’s be honest.

Will I continue with the workshop: Not interested in ClickFunnels at all, but I’ll keep this on the backburner.

Update: Still subscribed 😛

  1. 5x Your Traffic Using Pinterest by Jenna Kutcher

I didn’t manage to grab a snapshot on my newsfeed as this was a while ago, but I want to add Jenna Kutcher’s Pinterest course on here. Jenna does photography, podcasts, she’s an entrepreneur, yadda yadda, basically doing everything there is under the sun. I like her blog, but I’m also glad she’s not mentioning her income anywhere, because let’s be honest, photography alone can bring you significant revenue. 

Things I liked: I’m a sucker for long webinars because they’re always full of value etc. etc. Also, it was available immediately. There are workshop payment plans! Huzzah!

Things I didn’t like: Omg Jenna girl, you send way too many emails. See pic for an example. I had to unsubscribe. Also, the webinar didn’t teach me anything – the only super valuable lesson I got is that Pinterest is not social media, it’s a search engine and you should optimize it as such. Also, about 25 minutes in, it suddenly becomes an ad for her other course and that completely takes over for the duration of the webinar.

I also didn’t like the “You only get our never-before-shared 5 Day Pinterest Kickstarter of tried and tested Pinterest strategies for FREE when you enroll in The Pinterest Lab by midnight TONIGHT.” when you should already receive those strategies in The Pinterest Lab ANYWAYS. What’s the deal?

Will I continue with the workshop: Nope.

Conclusion

These marketers are more worried about retaining you as a customer to show off their success for retaining you than they are here to actually offer you something of value. While you do actually get some valuable information, you can easily get this for free. The ads are misleading and most of the time the copy just builds up the emotion and anticipation and then leaves you disappointed.

Previous Post Next Post

You Might Also Like

2 Comments

  • Reply Erica Carrico 9th October 2017 at 2:20 pm

    What a great thing to do! I’ve always wondered about these – and have so many clients looking to work from home, but wondering how many of these are scams. Thank you for your research!! xx

    • Reply Mandy Lutman 9th October 2017 at 3:13 pm

      Thank you Erica! I think articles like these are extremely important – many people stopped blogging with honesty and only focus on monetization (which often comes with forced-positive endorsement), so I hope something like this could be a bit more valuable.

    Leave a Reply